Applied to Medical School And Had No Offers?

Admissions

2019-12-14

If you've had no offers for medicine or not fulfilled your offer and you don't know where to go from here this post will hopefully give you a better sense of direction. Let's take a look...

Medify doesn't encourage negative thinking before or during the application process. Positive thinking has a lot to do with the results of a successful offer but if you've found yourself here after the application process with no offers then Medify is here to take you under our wings. This is the first of three posts specifically on this subject to get you back on track and finally reaching your dream goals.

Keep going:

If you are here due to getting an offer but you didn't achieve the grades to fulfil the conditions of the offer, the simple solution is to apply again and retake your exams to get the grades you need, work harder to make sure you get those grades. You got the offer, the school believes in you and your suitability to medicine, it is definitely worth trying again. Your grades are the targeted area that you need to work on, look at what grades specifically need improving and concentrate on them. You did everything else right, your personal statement was fine, your interviews were good, which is why you got the offer in the first place. 

Rethink:

Have a deep think about whether medicine is what you want to do. Getting four rejections first time around can be quite painful and disappointing, but it gives you a chance to really look inwards and decide: Is this really the career for me? Do I really want to do it? If you do really want to do it, then fantastic, you need to apply again. But if you are in two minds about it, then this is a good time to ask yourself these questions. 

It's all in the interview:

If you do want to apply again, look at every aspect of your application in detail, send it to other people such as friends who got in, or people you know in the years above, and ask them where they think the weak points are. Was it your personal statement? Could you have done more work experience? Did you get the interviews in the first place? If you got the interviews in the first place, then chances are your personal statement and application generally was strong enough, but maybe your performance at your interviews let you down.

It is a case of working out, why your performance at the interview might have not been as good as it could have and analysing what you could have done differently. Maybe it just didn't go well on the day, and being able to put in more and more interview practice will be sufficient, this is something that a lot of doctors have mentioned ‘it is not always the best person who gets the job, it is the person who performs best at the interview or the person who has prepared best for the interview.’ They suggest the interview is the most important part of your application, and when applying for jobs as doctors or surgeons, even though you have your whole CV, publications, presentations and posters, amongst other credits unless your interview performance is near to perfect on the day, chances are you are not going to get that job.

Were they really the right places for you?:

A lot of people applying the first time, don't put enough consideration into where, therefore, they apply to universities that require scores in the seven hundreds. Really think about where you are applying; some places don't accept retakes, some places do, some places don't like it when you take a gap year, some places do. Actively research universities in advance before applying and really tactically apply. Medicine is the same wherever you go in the UK, it really does not matter where you end up, provided you end up somewhere studying medicine; at least that is the line of thinking for most people in this position. 

Get excited:

You have a whole year of endless opportunities that are not going to be available to anyone else, people have reported eventually being happy about not getting in the first time around in hindsight. It is disappointing and soul-crushing at the time, but having had one, two or three gap years and doing interesting things, some people are really glad to have had that experience. Things they suggested were traveling, getting a job or working as a healthcare assistant. People at university, such as your friends, will not have these experiences, they will be attending lectures day in and day out and maybe doing placements. Whereas if you get the chance to travel abroad and volunteer in a hospital, volunteer for a charity, that will enrich you much more as a person than a year of university is going to enrich your friends. This is not a competition between you and your friends, but one way to feel better about taking a gap year is by making your gap year fantastic and doing things that will improve you as a person and enhance your future reapplication to medical school. 

It's not you it's me:

It might not have necessarily been you that was the deciding factor, it might just have been there happened to be more people than there were offers. Identify the areas you think you might be weak in and really actively track those down, but there is very little to be gained from feeling bad about yourself, feeling sorry for yourself, or thinking that you are not good enough, this is not really the way to personal improvement. Ultimately, don't worry, things will work out for the best.

Lewis McDonald, University of Dundee

“I thought my application was pretty solid, my interview performance was quite reasonable, but I still got four rejections. Initially, I took it really to heart and for a few weeks was quite sad about it and didn't really do much, wasn't really sure what to do because of all the effort I put into this application. It felt like all this effort went to waste, but eventually, I realised maybe it was not me, it was just medicine is unfortunately very competitive, there are loads and loads of people wanting to study the subject and very few spaces.” 

Be Kind To Yourself:

Don't be too hard on yourself. 


Feeling a bit overwhelmed and anxious right now? Didn’t quite make the percentile you need? Or only just starting out? Please don’t worry, head over to our UCAT Online Course and we’ll get you signed up to guide you through this whole process step-by-step.

We have a bank of over 10,239 questions, a decision-making section, and 8 full mock exams and 18 mini-mock exams; we even give you performance feedback too.

We’ve been lending a successful helping hand since 2009. Medify’s here to support you, just reach out to us.

Succeed in your Medical School interview

Start today for only £10

Medify BMAT

Helping you prepare

Buy Now

Write Your PS

Try Medify Today

Improve Your UCAT Score

Try Medify Now

Improve Your UCAT Score

Try Medify Now

Medify BMAT

Helping you prepare

Buy Now

Write Your PS

Try Medify Today

Improve Your UCAT Score

Try Medify Now